Guide to Birdhouses

Your garden lays at rest covered in a blanket of fresh snow but as most gardeners know, winter is the perfect time to plan for spring. Just as gardeners are scouring through seed catalogs, now is also the time to plan what kind of birds you want to attract this year to your yard and where you will place your birdhouse(s). Installing a birdhouse in your yard or garden can provide hours of enjoyment, which is reason enough to invite birds into your garden. However, birds are also a gardeners helping partner. Most birds, such as wrens and bluebirds love snacking on insects making them a great natural pest control.

Prairie Home Cypress Bird House

MasterGardening.com has a great new line of decorative and highly functional birdhouses to grace your yard or garden. Birdhouses can be decorative, adding style to your backyard or garden, but function should always be first in your mind when buying a birdhouse.

Different bird species have different requirements when it comes to nesting. Our Vintage Wren House is specially designed for wrens, place this house near brushes or thickets to give them an ideal nesting spot. All birdhouses should also be structurally sound with drainage and ventilation holes/slats, these holes prevent the baby birds from overheating or drowning. Our Prairie Home Bird House is made of solid cypress wood, the most popular choice for bird houses because of it’s durability and resistance to rot.

The entrance hole, platform size, and mounting height are all things to consider when purchasing a birdhouse. In addition, when placing your birdhouse(s) in your yard or garden, mount it in a place that will protect the birds from preditors such as cats. We have included a helpful table below to assist you in matching the bird species you wish to attact to the perfect birdhouse and environment.

Check out our complete new line of birdhouses, including some great ladybug and butterfly houses at MasterGardening.com

BIRD SPECIES Diameter of Hole (inches) Height Above Ground (feet) Helpful hints for attracting
Bluebird – Eastern 1 1/2″ 4-10′ Loves mealworms, bird grubs and insects
Bluebird – Mountain 1 1/2″ 4-10′ Loves mealworms, bird grubs and insects
Bluebird – Western 1 1/2″ 4-10′ Loves mealworms, bird grubs and insects
Brown Creeper/ American Tree Creeper 1 3/8″ 4-10′ Attracted to rough-barked trees
Chickadee – Black-capped 1 1/8″ 6-15′ Plant bayberry, elderberry, hemlock and pine, aspen or elm trees
Chickadee – Chestnut-backed 1 1/8″ 6-15′ Plant bayberry, elderberry, hemlock and pine, aspen or elm trees
Chickadee – Mountain 1 1/8″ 6-15′ Plant bayberry, elderberry, hemlock and pine, aspen or elm trees
Chickadee – Siberian 1 1/8″ 6-15′ Plant bayberry, elderberry, hemlock and pine, aspen or elm trees
Duck – Barrow’s Goldeneye 3″ 10-30′ Place house near water in sheltered area, tree lines
Duck – Bufflehead 4″ 10-20′ Place house near water in sheltered area, tree lines
Duck – Wood 4″ 10-20′ Place house near water in sheltered area, tree lines
Falcon – American Kestrel 3″ 8-30′ Like organic gardens, wire fences and dead trees for good hunting
Finch – House 2″ 8-12″ Like suet, nectar feeders, black oil sunflower seeds, and bird baths
Flycatcher – Ash-Throated 1 1/2″ 5-15′ Trees and shrubs for pearching with nearby open areas
Flycatcher – Great Crested 1 3/4″ 5-15′ Heavy tree cover and organic gardens
Hawk – Red-Tailed Platform 14′- up Forest edge or tree line near open farm land
Nuthatch – Brown-headed 1- 1/4″ 5-15′ Coniferous woods, oak, and maple trees
Nuthatch – Pygmy 1- 1/4″ 5-15′ Coniferous woods, oak, and maple trees
Nuthatch – Red-Breasted 1- 1/4″ 5-15′ Coniferous woods, oak, and maple trees
Nuthatch – White-Breasted 1 3/8″ 5-15′ Coniferous woods, oak, and maple trees
Osprey Platform 15′ – up Place platform over Water
Owl – Barn 6″ 12-18′ Large grassland area
Owl – Great Horned Platform 15′- up Open branches, away from power lines
Owl – Pygmy 2 1/2″ 10′- up Coniferous woods/forests
Owl – Saw-whet 2 1/2″ 12′- up Dense coniferous woodlands
Owl – Screech 3″ 8-30′ Old orchards, woods, and bird baths
Robin – American Nest Shelf 6-15′ Suburban and urban landscapes, berry bushes, fruit and shade trees
Snow Bunting 1 3/4″ 6-15′ Heavy shrubbery
Sparrow – House 1 1/8″- 2″ 10-20′ House should face east
Swallow – Barn Nest Shelf 8-12′ Wide open spaces and bird bath or pond
Swallow – Purple Martin 2 1/4″ 6-20′ Prefer a crescent shaped opening. Nest in groups, need a least 4 rooms
Swallow – Tree 1 1/2″ 5-15′ Large trees near wide open spaces and pond or lake
Swallow – Violet-Green 1 1/2″ 5-15′ Large trees near wide open spaces and pond or lake
Titmice 1 1/8″ 5-15′ Evergreens, beechnut, and oak trees, elderberry and bayberry bushes
Titmouse 1 1/4″ 6-15′ Evergreens, beechnut, and oak trees, elderberry and bayberry bushes
Warbler – Prothonotary 1 1/8″ 4-8′ Place house adjacent to or over water
Woodpecker – Downy 1 1/4″ 6-20′ Open woods, orchards, dead and large mature trees
Woodpecker – Flicker 2 1/2″ 6-20′ Dead wood, large mature trees oaks and conifers
Woodpecker – Hairy 1 1/2″ 8-20′ Open woods, orchards, large mature trees
Woodpecker – Lewis 2 1/2″ 12-20′ Oak and conifer trees, fruit and nut bearing trees
Woodpecker – Pileated 3-4″ 15-25′ Large mature trees, conifers
Woodpecker – Red-Bellied 2 1/2″ 10-20′ Open woods, orchards, large mature trees
Woodpecker – Red-Headed 2″ 12-20′ Open woods, orchards, large mature trees
Woodpecker – Yellow-bellied Sapsucker 1 1/2″ 10-20′ Young forests of birch and aspen, near fresh water source
Wren – Bewick’s 1 1/8″ 5-10′ Areas with brush, thickes and scrub near open land
Wren – Carolina 1 1/4″ 5-10′ Wooded area with heavy undergrowth
Wren – House 1 1/8″ 5-10′ Suburban and rural landscapes, shrubs and berry bushes
Wren – Winter 1 1/4″ 5-10′ Prefers domed structures. Open woods and tree lines, conifers




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